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* Index of the First Line of Each Stanza, the Fifth Line of Eight Line Stanzas, and the First Line of the Chorus

Great Redeemer, friend of sinners,

Poet: William Williams, (1717-1791) in Welsh; Translated by William Griffiths, 1822
Meter: 8s,7s Double (8,7,8,7,8,7,8,7)
Location in The Sacred Harp
Stanza Denson Cooper
1
Great Redeemer, friend of sinners,
Thou hast wondírous power to save;
Grant me grace, and still protect me,
Over lifeís tempestuous wave:
May my soul with sacred transport,
View the dawn while yet afar,
And until the sun arises,
Lead me by the morning star.



2
O! what madness! O! what folly,
That my heart should go astray;
After vain and foolish trifles,
Trifles only of a day:
This vain world with all its pleasures,
Very soon will be no more;
Thereís no object worth admiring,
But the God whom we adore.



3
See the happy spirits waiting,
On the banks beyond the stream,
Sweet responders still repeating,
Jesus, Jesus is their theme:
Hark! they whisper, lo! they call me,
Sister spirit, come away;
Lo! I come, earth canít contain me,
Hail the realms of endless day.


The Blessed Lamb 54, Stanza 1

4
Swiftly roll ye lingíring hours,
Seraphs lend your glittíring wings;
Love absorbs my ransom powers,
Heavenly sounds around me rings,
Worlds of light and crowns of glory,
Far above yon azure sky;
When by faith I now behold you.
Iíll enjoy you soon on high.




Translated into English based on the Welsh language hymn poem O Iachawdwr pechaduriaid; written by William Williams.
Social and Campmeeting Songs For the Pious. Fourth Edition. Baltimore: Armstrong & Plaskitt, 1822.